Seton Hall Law Review Issue on Accountable Care Organizations

seton hall law reviewJust a quick note to commend this issue to readers of HRW. As I note in an introduction to the volume, the articles are uniformly insightful contributions to very topical issues in health law and policy.

Volume Forty-Two E-Board

Editor-in-Chief
Temi Kolarova
Executive Editor
Daniel E. Bonilla
Managing Editor
Desiree L. Grace
Symposium Editor
Gianna Cricco-Lizza
Business Editor
Michael C. Smith
Senior Articles Editor
Jason S. Cetel
Articles Editors
Christopher Fox
Meghan McSkimming
Elizabeth C. Ralston
Lauren Winchester
Comments Editors
Eric M. Dante
Melissa M. Ferrara
Brandon M. Fierro
Rebecca Garibotto
Terrance Romasco Gallogly
Joseph K. Jakas
Submissions Editors
Robert S. Garrison Jr.
Ryan P. Montefusco
Andrew L. Van Houter

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Professor John Jacobi in New Jersey Spotlight on the impact thus far for the Affordable Care Act in New Jersey.

jacobi_johnProfessor John Jacobi appeared in a New Jersey Spotlight article which examined, rather comprehensively, the impact thus far for the Affordable Care Act in New Jersey. New Jersey Spotlight determined that

Healthcare in New Jersey is being profoundly altered by the 2010 Affordable Care Act, and no matter how the Supreme Court rules on its constitutionality, pilot programs to rein in spending and improve patient care will continue to roll.

New Jersey Spotlight details some rather impressive impact for the ACA in New Jersey thus far. It notes:

It will take several years for the ACA’s pilot programs to pay dividends, in the form of less inflation in healthcare costs and healthier people. But New Jersey has already reaped several benefits. The law has directed more than $700 million to New Jersey, according to an estimate by the Kaiser Family Foundation. That includes more than $100 million in prescription drug rebates, discounts for nearly 250,000 seniors on Medicare, and more than $300 million in grants to employers to help them pay for early retiree health benefits — a diverse list of about 90 public and private employers that includes the state of New Jersey, Princeton University, and Johnson & Johnson.

Extending Coverage

According to the federal Department of Health and Human Services, more than 68,000 young adults have health coverage today because the ACA requires insurance companies to keep dependents on their parent’s policies until age 26. More than 1.7 million New Jerseyans have benefitted from the ACA’s rule that private health providers can’t charge co-pays for certain preventive services, and nearly a million New Jersey Medicare members also are getting free preventive screenings.

Regarding ‘Coverage and Costs,’ the Spotlight notes:

Seton Hall Law School Professor John Jacobi said the ACA is more about getting people covered than trying to lower healthcare costs — with the exception of the ACO [Accountable Care Organizations], which “creates new incentives for healthcare providers to coordinate care, to care for people with multiple chronic illnesses at the right time and the right place with the right specialties, so there is a reduction in the duplication of services. It is a great step to take — to think about how we can actually save money.”

Read the full New Jersey Spotlight article, “The Affordable Care Act: Prescription for Change in NJ Healthcare

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Livestream Podcast, Seton Hall Law Review ACO Symposium

shl-logo-1In conjunction with the Center for Health & Pharmaceutical Law & Policy, this year’s SETON HALL LAW REVIEW Symposium explored recent changes in the structure of health care delivery, in particular the rising popularity of Accountable Care Organizations (ACOs).

Legal scholars and practitioners from around the country presented in panel discussions on structural development, public health implications and lessons learned from state ACO programs. The luncheon keynote speaker was Dr. Jeffrey Brenner, founder of the Camden Coalition of Healthcare Providers.

Streaming Audio Podcasts of Each Panel are Below, Beside the Radio in Blue–Just Click and Listen

Panels & Panelists

Introduction to Accountable Care Organizations

Introduction to ACOs Panel, Seton Hall Law Review_Symposium_1.asx

Jorge Lopez (Partner, Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld LLP): Promise and Pitfalls: Health Reform’s Medicare ACO Shared Savings Program

Hal Teitelbaum (CEO and Managing Partner, Crystal Run Healthcare): The Prospect of Being Hanged: Focusing the Physician Mind on ACOs

Michael Kalison (Chairman of Applied Medical Software, Inc.; Of Counsel, McElroy, Deutsch, Mulvaney, & Carpenter): The Lessons of Gainsharing

ACOs in Theory: Issues Raised by Integrated Delivery

ACO Theory: Issues, Seton Hall Law_Review_Symposium_2.asx,,

Jessica Mantel (Co-Director, Health Law & Policy Institute, University of Houston, Law Center): ACOs: Can we have our cake and eat it too?

Priscilla Keith (Adjunct Professor and Director of Research and Projects, Hall Center for Law and Health, Indiana University School of Law – Indianapolis): The Impact of Accountable Care Organizations on Public Health

Tara Ragone (Research Fellow, Seton Hall Law School): The Role of Competition in Integrated Delivery: ACOs, Federal and State Antitrust Law, and the State Action Doctrine

Keynote

Dr. Brenner, Seton Hall Law_Review_Symposium _Keynote.asx

Jeffrey Brenner, M.D., Founder & Executive Director, Camden Coalition of Healthcare Providers

Jeffrey Brenner is a family physician and has practiced in Camden for eleven years as a front-line primary care provider for patients of all ages. Having owned a private practice in Camden, he has experience in implementing electronic health records and running a paperless office, open-access scheduling, as well as first-hand knowledge of the various challenges facing primary care in the current health system.

He currently serves full-time as the Coalition’s Executive Director, where he spends much of his time meeting with stakeholders and policymakers, advocating for the models of care the Coalition has developed and demonstrated through data centric results. Jeff is a faculty member of the Robert Wood Johnson Medical School in Camden and is also a former resident of Camden, having lived in the city for over 8 years. He is a graduate of Vassar College and the Robert Wood Johnson Medical School.

ACOs in Practice: Research on Current Implementation of ACOs

ACOs in Practice, Current Implementation Research, Seton Hall Law_Review_Symposium_3.asx

Louise Trubek (Adjunct Professor of Law, Seton Hall Law, Clinical Professor Emerita, University of Wisconsin Law School), Barbara Zabawa (Whyte Hirschboeck Dudek, S.C); Felice Borisy-Rudin (University of Wisconsin Law School): Accountable care organizations in two states: A preliminary analysis

Sallie Sanford (Assistant Professor of Law, University of Washington – School of Law & School of Public Health): State-based ACO and Medical Home Pilots: Early Lessons from the Other Washington

John Jacobi (Faculty Director & Dorothea Dix Professor of Health Law & Policy, Seton Hall University School of Law), Lessons from ACO Implementation in New Jersey.

Thomas Greaney (Chester A. Myers Professor of Law and Director, Center for Health Law Studies, Saint Louis University School of Law), Accountable Care Organizations: A New New Thing with Some Old Problems.

law-review-header_31A Symposium Law Review with papers from the event is forthcoming. For more information regarding the Symposium, please contact Gianna Cricco-Lizza, Symposium Editor, at gianna.criccolizza@student.shu.edu

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ACO Symposium: Professor Tim Greaney to Present Accountable Care Organizations: A New New Thing with Some Old Problems

October 27, 2011 by · Leave a Comment
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Thomas Greaney, Chester A. Myers Professor of Law and Director, Center for Health Law Studies, Saint Louis University School of Law

Thomas Greaney, Chester A. Myers Professor of Law and Director, Center for Health Law Studies, Saint Louis University School of Law

In conjunction with the Center for Health & Pharmaceutical Law & Policy, this year’s Seton Hall Law Review Symposium on October 28, 2011, will explore recent changes in the structure of health care delivery, in particular the rising popularity of Accountable Care Organizations (ACOs). For more information or to register, click here.

The keynote speaker will be Dr. Jeffrey Brenner, founder of the Camden Coalition of Healthcare Providers, and legal scholars and practitioners from around the country will present panel discussions on structural development, public health implications and lessons learned from state ACO programs. One such distinguished presenter is  Thomas Greaney, Chester A. Myers Professor of Law and Director, Center for Health Law Studies, Saint Louis University School of Law, who has been a frequent contributor to HRW,  will take part in the panel on “ACOs in Practice: Research on Current Implementation of ACOs,” and will be presenting Accountable Care Organizations: A New New Thing with Some Old Problems.

A nationally recognized expert on health care and antitrust law, Professor Thomas (Tim) Greaney has spent the last two decades examining the evolution of the health care industry and is a vocal advocate for reforming the health care system and protecting consumers. He also has a strong interest in comparative antitrust law, having been a Fulbright Scholar in Brussels and a visiting lecturer at several European law schools.

After graduating from Harvard Law School, Greaney began his career as a legislative assistant on Capitol Hill and as a law clerk with the Federal Communications Commission. He then moved on to the Antitrust Division of the U.S. Department of Justice where he was a trial attorney and became the assistant chief in charge of antitrust matters in health care. His career at Justice spanned ten years and involved him in civil and criminal antitrust litigation in health care, banking, communications and other regulated industries as well as policy formulation and legislative matters.

Greaney came to SLU LAW in 1987 after completing two fellowships and a visiting professorship at Yale Law School. Professor Greaney became Chester A. Myers Professor of Law in 2004 and was named Health Law Teacher of the Year by the American Society of Law, Medicine and Ethics in 2007. His academic writing has been recognized six times by the Thompson Coburn Award for SLU Faculty scholarship.

Professor Greaney’s extensive body of scholarly writing on health care and antitrust laws encompasses articles published in some of the country’s most prestigious legal and health policy journals. Professor Greaney has authored or co-authored several books, including the leading health care casebook, Health Law. A frequent speaker in academia and the media, Professor Greaney has also offered expert testimony at hearings sponsored by the Federal Trade Commission on the issues of applying competition law and policy to health care, and submitted invited testimony to the U.S. Senate on competition policy and health care reform.

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ACO Symposium: Professor John V. Jacobi to Present: Lessons from ACO Implementation in New Jersey

Professor John V. Jacobi,

Professor John V. Jacobi, Faculty Director, Center for Health & Pharmaceutical Law & Policy, Dorothea Dix Professor of Health Law & Policy, Seton Hall University School of Law

In conjunction with the Center for Health & Pharmaceutical Law & Policy, this year’s Seton Hall Law Review Symposium on October 28, 2011, will explore recent changes in the structure of health care delivery, in particular the rising popularity of Accountable Care Organizations (ACOs). For more information or to register, click here.

The keynote speaker will be Dr. Jeffrey Brenner, founder of the Camden Coalition of Healthcare Providers, and legal scholars and practitioners from around the country will present panel discussions on structural development, public health implications and lessons learned from state ACO programs. One such distinguished presenter is John V. Jacobi , Faculty Director, Center for Health & Pharmaceutical  Law & Policy,Dorothea Dix Professor of Health Law & Policy, Seton Hall University School of Law. Professor Jacobi, who frequently contributes to HRW,  will take part in the panel on “ACOs in Practice: Research on Current Implementation of ACOs,” and will be presenting Lessons from ACO Implementation in New Jersey.

Professor John Jacobi’s work is primarily in the areas of Health Insurance and Access, Mental Health Law, and Disability Law.

Professor Jacobi received his B.A., summa cum laude, from the State University College of New York at Buffalo and his J.D., magna cum laude, from Harvard Law School. He teaches Health Law, Health Finance, Disability Law, Public Health Law, Mental Health Law, and Torts. Professor Jacobi spent five years working for the New Jersey Department of the Public Advocate as Special Assistant to the Commissioner, where he worked on health, civil rights, and disability issues through litigation and advocacy in legislatures and regulatory agencies. He then became a Gibbons Fellow at the law firm of Gibbons, Del Deo, Dolan, Griffinger & Vecchione, where he pursued health, prisoners’ rights, and disability issues. During 2007-2008 he was on leave from the law school, serving as Senior Associate Counsel to N.J. Governor Jon S. Corzine on Health, Human Services, and Chrildren’s Issues.

Professor Jacobi writes and speaks on issues including disability rights, health access and finance, public health, and mental health. His recent and current scholarly projects include examining the improvement of chronic care in health systems, the funding and structure of Early Intervention Services for children with disabilities, examining the obligations of government to provide services to people with serious mental illness, the clash of disability rights and public health interests, and the prospects and social effects of “consumer-driven” health insurance models on health costs and rights of access for the poor and people with disabilities. He served on the Governor’s Task Force on Mental Health, the Board of Advisors of the New Jersey Office of Child Advocacy, the New Jersey Olmstead Advisory Council on disability rights, and on other government and non-profit boards and committees.

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