Health Insurance

Coverage and Care: Oversight and Transparency

Coverage and Care: Oversight and Transparency

Editor’s Note: This post from Seton Hall Law Professor John Jacobi is the fourth in a series of four growing out of a conference on insurance coverage of mental health and substance use disorder treatment that the law school’s Sentinel Project hosted earlier this month. You can find Part One here, Part Two here, and Part Three here. By […]

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Provider Networks for Behavioral Health Care

Provider Networks for Behavioral Health Care

Editor’s Note: This post from Seton Hall Law Professor John Jacobi is the third in a series of four growing out of a conference on insurance coverage of mental health and substance use disorder treatment that the law school’s Sentinel Project hosted earlier this month. You can find Part One, here, and Part Two, here. […]

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Discrimination, Parity, and Standards in Behavioral Health Coverage

Discrimination, Parity, and Standards in Behavioral Health Coverage

Editor’s Note: This post from Seton Hall Law Professor John Jacobi is the second in a series of four growing out of a conference on insurance coverage of mental health and substance use disorder treatment that the law school’s Sentinel Project hosted earlier this month. You can find Part One, here. By John V. Jacobi […]

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Behavioral Health: Can Coverage Assure Care?

Behavioral Health: Can Coverage Assure Care?

Editor’s Note: This post from Seton Hall Law Professor John Jacobi is the first in a series of four growing out of the conference on insurance coverage of mental health and substance use disorder treatment that the law school’s Sentinel Project hosted earlier this month. By John V. Jacobi Access to care has long been […]

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Medical Balance Billing – How Far is Too Far?

Filed in Health Care Economics, Health Insurance by on December 16, 2014 0 Comments
Medical Balance Billing – How Far is Too Far?

By Christine O’Neill Healthcare costs in the United States topped $3.8 billion in 2013 according to Forbes.com.  Industry experts offer many hypotheses as to why costs are so high including excessive administrative costs and the fact that Americans pay more for and receive more care than citizens in many other developed countries.  One contributing factor […]

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